In hopes of raising awareness about the important issue of global maternal health, Helium partnered with the Pulitzer Center to sponsor a writing contest as part of the Global Issues/Citizen Voices Essay Contest asking the question, “Hundreds of thousands of women die each year due to complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. What are the first steps to making a difference?”

With 41 entries the variety of topics was broad. The winner is Helium writer Alexandra Fielden with her article about the Millennium Development Goal 5 and her experience working on women’s reproductive health in the Maldives. The article was rated fifth on Helium. Congrats Alexandra!

“I think Helium’s partnership with the Pulitzer Center is an absolutely superb way to get people thinking about important issues facing the world today. The medium enables the public to start to form their own opinions, and to question their validity, as opposed to simply reading about what ‘the experts’ think and immediately forgetting about it afterward,” says Fielden. “Personal (sometimes emotional) connections and the public’s interaction with these issues seems to me to be an excellent way of creating an impact by facilitating ‘social e-momentum’ towards positive change. Many thanks to Helium and the Pulitzer Center!”

For more information on this issue read the corresponding coverage at the Pulitzer Gateway Dying for Life page. Or read all the Helium articles now.

In hopes of raising awareness about the important issue of safe water, Helium partnered with the Pulitzer Center to sponsor a writing contest as part of the Global Issues/ Citizen Voices Essay Contest asking the question “Inadequate access to safe water and sanitation claims 4,500 lives a day. What should we do about it?” We asked writers to determine how we can begin fixing this dilemma.

With 103 entries, the variety of topics was immense. The winner is Helium writer Winn Mete with her article about the University of Alaska Anchorage’s student chapter of Engineers Without Borders’ work at the Rhema Grace orphanage in Tiko, Cameroon. The essay was also rated number one on Helium.com.

According to the Pulitzer Center, “It was difficult to choose a single winner as there were so many interesting articles. However, the best essays engaged this oft overlooked topic in a way that even those completely unaware of the water crisis would understand its importance.  Our winner, Winn Mete, best demonstrated how this issue affects everyone.”

Read an interview with winner Winn Mete on the Pulitzer Center’s blog. Congrats Winn!

We’re excited to announce the latest winners of Helium’s Citizen Journalism Award contests.

Kenneth Boser II won the 1H20 Citizen Journalism Award by writing about the United States’ position on access to clean drinking water as a basic human right and how it compares with the policies of other countries.

Mouhcine Azizoun won the 1H20 Citizen Journalism Award by writing about what is causing Lake Chad and other lakes to shrink.

Be sure to check out more information on these contests and the current winner on the 1h20 website.

Be sure to check out the current Citizen Journalism contests and let your voice be heard.

We’re excited to announce the latest winners of Helium Citizen Journalism Award contests.

Barb won the 1H20 Citizen Journalism Award by writing about the main source of pollution in America’s rivers and lakes and how experts think the problem can be resolved. Be sure to check out more information on this contest and the current winner on the 1h20 website.

Elizabeth M. Young won the Center for Responsive Politics/OpenSecrets Citizen Journalism Award by writing about changes she would make to the nation’s campaign finance system.

Be sure to check out the current Citizen Journalism contests and let your voice be heard.

We’re excited to announce the latest winner of a Helium Citizen Journalism Award contest.

Mark Sullivan won the 1H2O Citizen Journalism Award by writing about whether future wars are going to be fought over water or if leaders will be able to resolve conflicts as they have in the past Be sure to check out more information on this contest and the current winner on the 1H2O website.

Be sure to check out the current Citizen Journalism contests and let your voice be heard.

We’re excited to announce the latest winners of Helium Citizen Journalism Award contests.

Jimmy Nightingale won the 1H20 Citizen Journalism Award by writing about why rivers are straightened and the effect it has on the environment. Be sure to check out more information on this contest and the current winner on the 1h20 website.

Ludmillia Jones won the Center for Responsive Politics/OpenSecrets Citizen Journalism Award by writing about whose voice is being heard the most in the debate on health care reform.

Be sure to check out the current Citizen Journalism contests and let your voice be heard.

We’re excited to announce the latest winner of a Helium Citizen Journalism Award contest.

Sudesh Samuel won the ResearchSEA-Asia Research News Citizen Journalism Award by writing about Asia’s main challenges in 2009, including the global economic crisis, climate change, political upheavals and moreKristin Schaaf took home second place and Cecelia Rodriquez took third.

Be sure to check out the current Citizen Journalism contests and let your voice be heard.

We’re excited to announce the latest winner of a Helium Citizen Journalism Award contest.

Sarah Parrish won the 1H20 Citizen Journalism Award by writing about the links between droughts in California and Argentina, two places that are thousands of miles apart and in distinctly different places on the globe. Be sure to check out more information on this contest and the current winner on the 1h20 website.

Be sure to check out the current Citizen Journalism contests and let your voice be heard.

We’re excited to announce the latest winner of the Helium Citizen Journalism Award contest.

Sudesh Samuel won the 1H20 Citizen Journalism Award by writing about how the health of a river affects the vitality of a region. Be sure to check out more information on this contest and the current winner on the 1h2O website.

Be sure to check out the current Citizen Journalism contests and let your voice be heard.

This week there are several new Citizen Journalism Award contests.

Go to 1H2O’s Citizen Journalism Award contest page. The new contest title is Can individuals significantly ease the world water crisis, or must we rely on governments, corporations, the United Nations, the European Union and non-profits, for a remedy?

This title is now open to contest submissions. The submission deadline is Thursday, February 12. A winner will be announced about two weeks later, after sufficient rating has taken place.

Go to Sunshine Week’s Citizen Journalism Award contest page. The new contest title is What kind of official government information should be available online, and what do you consider to be off limits?

This title is now open to contest submissions. The submission deadline is Friday, February 13. A winner will be announced about two weeks later, after sufficient rating has taken place.

Go to ResearchSEA – Asia Research News ’s Citizen Journalism Award contest page. The new contest title is Since the world faces many challenges in 2009 including a global economic crisis, climate change, political upheavals and more, what are Asia’s main challenges in 2009 and how will you be affected?

This title is now open to contest submissions. The submission deadline is Tuesday, March 31. A winner and two runner ups will be announced on April 15, after sufficient rating has taken place.